The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

Nashville Pussy - From Hell To Texas

Pussy power!

 

A band who unashamedly worship sex, booze & rock n roll, Nashville Pussy have released a bunch of albums glorifying the redneck way of life, the touring life of a rock n roll band, and the hedonism that goes with it.

 

Like Skynyrd tweaking on methamphetamine and playing at double speed, The Pussy play their way through 12 whiskey-fuelled paens to living fast and dying young, taking no prisoners and slowing for no stop signs along the way.

 

When Blaine Cartwright screams “I was born to die in a rock n roll band” in his acid-gargling voice on the title track, you know he means it. “I gotta keep on living, cos dead men can’t get drunk” is another statement of intent (Dead Men Can’t Get Drunk) and when he boasts he is “a drunk driving man” on the song of the same name, you know you want to make sure you’re not walking the streets after he’s been drinking nearby.

 

Nashville Pussy are the real deal – I’ve no doubt they eat whiskey bottles for breakfast and shit rock n’ roll, and as hot as Ruyter Suys and Karen Cuda (Lead guitar and bass respectively) are, I wouldn’t be eyeing them up in a bar for fear of a heinous beatdown, and that’s just from the girls themselves.

 

It’s not all head shaking, brain pummelling aggression though - Lazy Jesus has a sub-ZZ Top vibe to it, with a chanted chorus from the girls which gives it an endearing and almost childlike revivalist church-house quality; in I’m So High where the 2 boys share lead vocals, it’s the backing vocals that again make the difference, this time with a slightly off-kilter, soaring “highhhhhhhhhhhhhh” in each chorus. Should I be embarrassed that I’m reminded of Doctor & The Medics cover of Spirit In The Sky on this one? Why Why Why is another standout, with a great vocal and lead guitar melody line, and some more churchy touches in the chanted chorus background vocals and handclaps.

 

Ruyter’s lead guitar shines throughout, especially on Pray For The Devil where it pretty much carries the song, and some great country fried metal on Stone Cold Down.

 

Sure it’s all belligerent and blustery, and by the twelfth song it sounds a little samey, but Nashville Pussy manage to inject enough original flavour and genuine humour into their songs, along with the deft touches of colour that the more interesting background vocal elements provide, so this album is a winner for me. Now, where’s my whiskey bottle…?

 

Shane