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The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world
The Peep Tempel Joy Review
THE PEEP TEMPEL
JOY

WING SING RECORDS
Release Date: October 14th 2016

The Peep Tempel

There is a frankness to be felt when giving Joy by Melbourne rock band The Peep Tempel a listen. Feeling like the band is holding up a proverbial mirror to the state of Western Australia, the record feels ubiquitouslylocal. Even with the lyrical titles alone including Kalgoorlie and references to the recreational drug ice in Rayguns, it feels like a cheeky comment on the current state of Western Australian society, whether that is the case is down to the interpretation of the listener. But audibly, it makes way for a great rock record – giving nods to genres of Punk and the softer more emotive tendencies associated with ballads.
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Kalgoorlie kicks of the record with a tight clasp of the snare, a cheeky bass riff and slow descending guitar riff from the lead. It almost welcomes the listener into a descent of chaos, the notion only re-affirmed by the apathetic tone of lead singer Blake Scott's vocals and overall lyrics. We You Forgot contains punkish angst and is embedded with slight political themes of forgotten people and lyrics painting a collage of ravenous anger as displayed in the lyrics.

Rayguns is perhaps a greatest example of the album's strengths, a tight punk record with a quick tempo and half-sang, half spoken vocal. In some ways, it gives off vibes reminiscent of London Calling by the Clash and it is what epitomises where the talent of The Peep Tempel as a band lies. Being that the band's music can seemingly tap into any kind of anti-establishment sentiment and make listener turn into an armchair, semi-anarchic revolutionary.

Constable takes the record down a more ballad, nostalgic road, with gentle harmonics from the guitars and a slower drum beat than the punkish onset of the record. It's a gentle reflection of the life of a policeman and the lyrics make you feel emphatic to the character the band is trying to audibly portray.

The album kicks itself back into gear again with the jarring rock-anthem which is Don't Race and the quirky showmanship felt in Alexander. The record is certainly a LP which makes you move as much as it makes you think, lyrically it is an open book which takes you a journey, with each track feeling like an individual page detailing an individual story. It's a musical journey coloured with a rock-opera soundtrack.

Neuroplasticity opens with a party riff and as with the other tracks an impressive, sustained drum break to carry the track to where it needs to go. Feeling more like a 80's party-anthem, it's a dandy rock track which oozes unnaturally fluid dance moves and explosive chorus neatly layered with yells from the other band members.

Finishing up with Go Slow and Brains, the record finishes it just as it started, in a fury of rapidly interlaced guitar riffs and sweeping rhythms and chords. Ultimately it's an album to get the listener to move and think, tie a bandana around their head and March down the street exclaiming revolutionary profanities. Go and have a listen - viva la revolution baby.


TRACKLIST
Kalgoorlie
Totality
We You Forgot
Rayguns
Constable
Don't Race
Alexander
Neuroplasticity
Go Slow
Brains

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Review by Joseph Wilson