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The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world
TYSON LESLIE TRAIN WRECKS HAVOK AND HEARTBREAK REVIEW 2014

 

TYSON LESLIE - TRAIN WRECKS HAVOK AND HEARTBREAK

SELF-RELEASED

RELEASED 2014

 

 

From the Rick Springfield-lite pop rock of opener ‘Little Green Honda’ there’s a surprisingly airy touch to the sound here, that seems to belie the more metallic sounding album title ‘Train Wrecks, Havoc and Heartbreak’.

 

Indeed it’s a track that is more than enough to keep your attention, underscored as it is by some great melodies that do remind you both of Paul Gilbert’s lighter solo material and a touch of Butch Walker thrown in. Clocking in close to five minutes though, it’s an oddly unwieldy length for a prospective single.

 

‘She Danced Under Lights’ that follows is a light melodic number featuring a Lyndsey Lou duet, whose vocal gives it a surprising extra weight to what essentially is another light and airy pop-rock outing with a little hint of Country flavour.

 

There’s a light Elvis Costello vibe to ‘Selective Amnesia’ whilst it maintains the same light pop ground. ‘A Mourning To Lament’ is the contrast that the album needed though and adds a gravitas without taking the mood right down. Similarly ‘Goodbye to the Rain’ is a simple and pleasing ballad and one of the most memorable tracks here.

 

Sadly after a while the deliberately limited palate starts to wear a bit thin in places: ‘Suckerfish’ is perhaps too self-consciously trying to be Butch Walker, and falls short, while the up-tempo ‘Stranger’ just isn’t as good a song as  some of the others here.  By ‘Wasted Time’ you will either be loving the consistency, or finding it worryingly lightweight and one dimensional.

 

‘If He Comes Home’ is worryingly ‘Steve Miller-like’ even before the name-check makes it obvious, it’s nice, nothing more. ‘Blanket For You Soul’ even though it lays a Country waltz sheen over proceedings seems little more than an attempt at injecting more texture into the tracklist, and at six and a half minutes really has nothing more today than a song half its length would have.

 

Aside from the first two tracks which still soar after repeated listens and the Beatles-like floating keys of closer ‘The Last Words’ – a song of great substance and emotion; this is a strangely lightweight and one-paced album where some of the songs don’t quite make the grade. However if you are a fan of the likes of the kind of light pop-rock few do that well these days, this looks far more like a winner.  

 

 

by Leslii Phillips

 

TYSON LESLIE TRAIN WRECKS HAVOK AND HEARTBREAK REVIEW 2014