The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world
THE QUIREBOYS BLACK EYES SONS REVIEW 2014

 

THE QUIREBOYS

BLACK EYED SONS

OFF YER ROCKA

JUNE 15 2014

 

 

The Quireboys have gone through a renaissance over recent years with a huge album ‘Beautiful Curse’ hitting the shelves (do albums still do that?) in 2013 and causing quite a stir here and featuring in our ‘Best of’ that year. ‘Black Eyed Son’ with its pugilistic connotations is therefore met with a certain amount of expectation.

 

The cutting riff and drums of ‘Troublemaker (Black Eyed Son)’ is more than enough to set us at ease. It’s a hard-rocking Quireboys tune with just the right amount of Bluesy swagger and some wonderful trademark gravelly vocals that hit all the right spots.

 

‘What Do You Want From Me’ that follows has a slow satisfying groove, and a killer hooky melody and ‘Julieanne’ is the sort of mellow ballad that can’t help recall The Faces. It’s these three tracks that set up an immensely satisfying album that still captures that spark of what real Rock and Roll means to people like me: a ‘Rhythm and Blues’ based sound with great melodies and guitar that wring out the emotion. 

 

We rock harder on songs like ‘Double Dealin’’ which could still teach ‘flavour of the month’ bands like The Temperance Movement or even The Rival Sons a lesson, and the change of pace for the wonderful country-tinged ‘Stubborn Kinda Heart’ shows the range that those previously mentioned bands are lauded for. Just because a band is ‘of a certain age’ does not mean that they can’t still produce the goods and for The Quireboys what is so staggering is that they are just as good and just as relevant as they have ever been, and probably even more relevant than for years.

 

Any band that can end with such a soulful pair as ‘Mother’s Ruin’ and acoustic-led ‘Monte Cassino (Mothers Ruin)’ is all class. This platter may have it’s fair share of slower fare, but it is all class.

 

This is an album that succeeds on so many levels from the stomp of ‘Lullaby of London Town’; the swagger of ‘You Never Can Tell’ to the lilting balladry of ‘The Messenger’. In its ten tracks ‘Black Eyed Sons’ it shows you exactly why The Quireboys are still such a fine band in their 30th Anniversary year.

 

 

by Mark Diggins

 

THE QUIREBOYS BLACK EYES SONS REVIEW 2014