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The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world
MY BON SCOTT by IRENE THORNTON BOOK REVIEW

MY BON SCOTT

by IRENE THORNTON

MACMILLAN

2014

 

Irene Thornton brings a different perspective to the Bon Scott story with her personal recollections of her life with the voice of AC/DC.


It’s always interesting to get the other side of a story, and while of course many of the more sensational aspects of Bon Scott’s life are well documented along with the myths, rumours and  tall tales here we get Bon’s wife’s account of her years with him and their correspondence beyond. While there is nothing earth-shattering here it’s a joyously naive book that  paints a softer picture of Bon without necessarily pulling too many punches.


It of course all begins as a love story on the grim streets of 70’s Adelaide and grows to cross the globe to England as Bon’s Adelaide band Fraternity take flight. It’s a story of the everyday pressures of life we all face on one level, but also the torturous nature of rock and roll and how having that particular drive has such an effect on those closest.


In truth this is a tale of sadness and joy and a realisation that Bon was destined to be Bon despite the setbacks and despite marriage there was never any question he could be anything else. Yet despite that hedonism and lifestyle there’s another story to tell and Irene does that without gloss. London is a nightmare as Fraternity fails to make an impact, then after the hiatus comes AC/DC.


The story of that particular band of course is best told elsewhere but it is the wedge that breaks the couple and despite letters and visits and the ever climbing exposure of the band in the background you can almost feel the two receding into each other’s respective rear view mirrors.


The strength of the book isn’t in the fact that it reveals facts about AC/DC or Bon that you were unaware of, it’s the fact that it is drawn from Bon’s letters and that it reveals a softer side to the hard-drinking, wise-cracking, larrikin bogan icon that you may have suspected existed but certainly had never read about it before.
I guess the final question – which Irene asks herself throughout the book is “Do you ever move on completely or stop being Mrs Bon Scott?” I think the fact that this book has been written after so many years answers that particular question.

 

 

Mark Rockpit

 

MY BON SCOTT by IRENE THORNTON BOOK REVIEW 2014