The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

LAST OF A DYIN' BREED

2012

 

THE LAST OF A DYIN' BREED IS VERY MUCH ALIVE AND WELL!

 

 

First of all let’s just say that we’re not going to use up half of this review with a recap of the history of Lynyrd Skynyrd, we’re assuming that everyone knows that right? Or at least has access to wikipedia?

 

At The Rockpit we loved Skynyrd’s last outing: ‘God and Guns’ which was a fine album with plenty of high points. And new slab ‘Last of a Dyin’ Breed’ starts off well enough with the title track on which Van Zant name-checks his departed brother and vows to carry on. It’s a muscular track with a good tempo that exemplifies all that is still strong about Skynyrd. A promising start indeed.

 


‘One Day at a Time’ takes the tempo down: and again works so well in capturing the spirit of Skynyrd that has risen and fallen over the years with all the tragedy that has befallen the band. It’s a song you can quite happily sing along to and I imagine that a lot of fans will be happy where this seems to be leading.

 


There are some missteps here and there though, and you can feel for the band that is on one hand obviously the flagship for Southern Rock and still so intertwined with their own inimitable past; and yet obviously wants to grow and sound fresh. So when they try to do ‘modern radio-rock’ like on ‘Homegrown’ you root for then in trying something different, but just wish they wouldn’t.

 


Conversely when they put a modern gloss on their traditional sound it just works so much better: ‘Ready to Fly’ is a ballad that soars high and ‘Mississippi Blood’ is a classic swampy country rocker that sees Medlocke and Van Zant trading lines.   

 


It’s great to see and hear how Skynyrd seem to have refocused over the last few years and ‘Last of a Dyin’ Breed’ is a an album that is comparable to the quality of “God and Guns’. Great to see there is life in the old dog yet.

 

 

by Leslie Phillips