The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

BAND OF SKULLS

SWEET SOUR

RELEASED 2012

 


 

Band of Skulls just have ‘it’ whatever ‘it’ may be. Loved by high-brow critics, the pretentious, the cool kids and seasoned hard rock fans like me I guess that Band of Skulls is just one of those bands that has captured whatever that vital essence of rock and roll is and melded it into aural shapes that cast a wide net. I really love this record, probably more or at least as much as anything I have heard so far this year.

 

 

From the almost psychedelic reverie of ‘Wanderluster’ to the proto-hard rock of title track ‘Sweet Sour’ this is al album that covers a lot of ground and spits in the face of convention while managing to embrace diversity without sounding at all fragmented.

 

 

Here there is something for everyone who has a soul. From the gentle ‘Lay My Head Down’ which hints at Floyd, mellowed by time and eroded by centuries of gently flowing water to ‘You’re Nor Pretty But You Got It Going On’ which is all riff and hipster groove.   

 

 

That’s not to say every track is a sure fire winner, the mellower ‘Navigate’ just seems to miss something despite its yearning beauty, it’s one of the few tracks that aren’t instant. ‘Hometowns’ though is probably my low-point despite its nice lyrical content it seems to rely too much on creating a mood without much substance.

 

 

This is a record of greatness and substance. And to find a ‘cool’ band like this with a love of riffs and some blues-infused noise is something that really doesn’t happen to often.

 

 

Whilst I loved there last record, ‘Sweet Sour’ is both harder and heavier progeny. Like bands like ‘White Stripes’ and ‘Black Keys’ Band of Skulls is just one of those bands that isn’t afraid to go its own way.   

 

 

Swampy-Southern Blues from Southampton England. Who'd have thought it?

 

 

By Mark Diggins