The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world

The Rock Pit - Hard rock, Metal and Blues Interviews, news & reviews from Australia and around the world
Guy-Pratt-Book-Review-August-2011

GUY PRATT
My Bass And Other Animals

Orion Books, 2007

 

 

By Shane Pinnegar

 

Does the name Guy Pratt ring any bells? It should. He’s been the regular touring bassist for Pink Floyd since Roger Waters split in the Eighties, played on a myriad of tracks and albums for some of pop and rock’s biggest names (Michael Jackson & Madonna to name but two), toured with the likes of Roxy Music, Page & Plant and Icehouse, and is living proof that you don’t need to be a tattooed, long haired, Jack Daniels swilling lead guitarist to live the rock n’ roll dream in all its hedonistic glory.

 

Yes Guy Pratt walked the walk, he’s been there & done that – and written the book on all the amusing, sordid and downright laugh out loud Spinal Tapism of the whole thing. He even talks the talk – with spoken word gigs at comedy festivals, opening the door to shed a little light on what actually goes on behind the scenes of the rock n’ roll machine.

 

 

Which is not to say he hasn’t acted like a right, errr, prat for a lot of it – though he manages to render this tale with enough endearing qualities that you forgive him many of his trespasses, even if you’re glad you weren’t there with him some of the time.

 

His is a self deprecating tale though – he’s not shy of admitting his ritual selfishness and personal indulgence - and the ridiculous, dangerous and laughable situations he got himself into as a result!

 

Essentially a chronological bio, the book follows our anti-hero through one disgrace after another, until he eventually grows up JUST enough to get married and settle down… a bit. To one of his bosses's daughter's, that is - Gala Wright, daughter of Pink Floyd's Rick Wright - another source of some very funny anecdotes! A very enjoyable read indeed, and a rare peek down the rabbit hole to the “pointy end of the music business.”